Uuta    48  Chevrolet

Uuta 48 Chevrolet

Uuta 48 Chevrolet Ute

This is a Blog to document the Rejuvenation / Restoration of a 1948 Chevrolet Ute. At the beginning we bought a rusty body and chassis in a condition that was best described as "ready for restoration" After a few months of preparation and planning another complete and running Ute was found in much beter condition. So the original body was sold off and the process started again with the new vehicle. The plan is to do a major update of the drivetrain, motor / gearbox etc. to bring it to a "modern" standard. It will be classified as a "Streetrod" for registration purposes and subject to stringent testing of all components and workmanship during construction.

Modifications

Modifying the DrivetrainPosted by Brian Wed, December 17, 2014 05:55:12
Now the real work begins. I have removed the body from the chassis and taken off the brackets that will not be needed. Also the front end and rear end unbolted and the old six cylinder motor removed. Just left with a bare chassis. It is in really good conditionand will need no repairs at all.

The motor and front end were sold to another enthusiast with a similar car who has plans to rebuild to original. This money can go towards some other parts for this one.The body removed and placed on timber stands waiting for panel repairs. These to be done after the chassis and suspension and new motor etc are fitted.

A motor has been purchased, an LS 1 from a VX SS Commodore. Low K's and came with the wiring harness and computer to run it. Should be just plug it all in and ready to go. All complete motor with steering pump, A/C compressor and alternator. Also a new reverse fit sump to allow the motor to clear the front crossmember.

Now that the chassis has been stripped of all the original brackets etc that are not needed I can start to fabricate the brackets to mount the Jaguar units. These are a relatively easy fit with no real modification necessary to the chassis. The first task is to make the new brackets that will mount the Jaguar IFS with the manufacturers original type of rubber mounts. That is it is mounted as it was on the Jaguar XJ6 originally. This allows the front end to have aflexable mount rather than being welded in place. This movement reduces the stress on the unit and the chassis.
I bought new rubber bushes and mounts for the front and rear mounting points..And have to make brackets to adapt these to the Chevrolet chassis.
You can see in the photos below the Chev chassis and the Jaguar front suspension mounting arm with a new bracket made to suit. These are clamped in place until the position is checked for the correct position in relation to the body and wheel arches.

Mounting the Jaguar unit in this way lowers the height of the chassis which will make the whole vehicle stance much lower. This will improve handling and the suspension will provide a much better ride as well as improved steering and braking. The IFS unit has power assisted rack and pinion steering and large ventilated disc brakes. It is also wider that the Chev unit and gives an increased front track.
I have added an extra front crossmember to strengthen the front section of the Chev frame. The mounting for the front panels will be altered with new mounting points fabricated. The radiator was mounted in a frame by the factory and the guards both inner and outer bolted to it but this will not be used. This will allow us to move the radiator position later. There will be more room needed in this area for A/C condenser and electric fans

The photos above and below show the suspension mounts and the crossmember with the radiator support panel even though it will not be used. The front panels are bolted on for a trail fit to ensure all will fit properly.
The ride height has been reduced by 100mm but there is still plenty of clearance under the front.

The panels were then removed again and more measuring was done to check for correct fit of all components. The front shock absorbers from the jaguar are not suitable being very long. These protrude too far up into the wheel arch. So we needed another bracket made to mount some shorter more suitable shockers.